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positive outlook
April 14, 2020

Tips for Maintaining a Positive Outlook Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic

In only a short time, the novel coronavirus has disrupted the way we live our daily lives. Almost everyone is now facing an uncertain future, not knowing when – or if – they will be able to keep themselves and their family healthy until researchers identify a vaccine. Many people have lost their jobs or seen their salaries scaled back. Others who are fortunate enough to be able to work from home full-time have had to relearn how to create a healthy work/life balance.

When all the headlines are full of doom and gloom, it can be easy to let anxiety control you, but you can’t live your life in a state of chronic fear. Here are some ways to keep a positive outlook.

1. Look to Your Past

You’ve probably experienced unexpected life disruptions before. For example, maybe you’ve lived through a natural disaster that has affected your community. Perhaps you’ve dealt with the aftermath of a car accident or a home break-in. Think back to the inner reserves of resiliency you drew upon during those challenges, and call upon them again. Reframing adversity in terms of what you can learn from it can help you with your positive outlook.

2. Make Yourself Laugh

If you’re feeling stressed out, take a break to watch something funny. Laughter is your body’s powerful mechanism for helping you feel good, releasing endorphins and making you healthier along the way. After a good laugh, you’ll boost your immune system and have more feelings of goodwill.

3. Stay in Touch the Old-Fashioned Way

Technology has provided you many options for staying connected with friends and family members you can’t see face to face while you’re observing self-quarantine. However, think about providing an unexpected pick-me-up in these times of crisis. Write a happy card or note to someone you care about and drop it in the mail. Or, bake a batch of cookies and send surprise care packages to your loved ones. You’ll be brightening people’s days while supporting the U.S. Postal Service, which is in dire financial trouble during this crisis.

4. Start a Journal

Journaling is an excellent way to work through challenging feelings such as stress and help you reevaluate where you stand in life. If you’ve always meant to start a journal, but never gotten around to it, the current crisis presents a perfect opportunity to do so. Your journal can be either digital or physical, and you don’t have to follow any kind of formal process. Jot down brief bullet points or complete sentences – whatever feels natural to you. Keep track of difficult emotions if you need to, but try to keep each entry upbeat. Over time, you’ll have something you can return to and see how much progress you’ve made with your positive outlook.

5. Practice Random Acts of Kindness for a Positive Outlook

Leave generous tips for delivery workers who are helping keep you supplied with essentials while you observe self-quarantine. Or, head over to a crowdfunding site such as GoFundMe and find a cause to contribute money toward. If you’re trying to be mindful of your budget, you don’t have to spend a dime to be kind. Endorse a colleague on LinkedIn, or leave a positive review for a small business in your community. Message someone a joke or a reminder to take time for self-care.

6. Take Advantage of Extra Time

If you find yourself feeling bored when you’re housebound, use that extra time to teach yourself a skill or find a new hobby you enjoy. If you have an abundance of restless energy, see where you can do some spring cleaning or repairs around the house. Finding ways to be productive with your idle hours is a healthy coping strategy.

Beach House’s Leadership During COVID-19

As one of the nation’s foremost providers of evidence-based addiction treatment, Beach House has taken a series of positive steps to protect our staff and residents during the coronavirus outbreak. We continue to stay COVID-19 symptom-free, with the goal of remaining a safe haven for people who need lifesaving help to break free from the cycle of substance abuse. To speak with our admissions counselors, contact us today.

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