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Ask for help
December 9, 2015

You Don’t Have To Do It Alone: How to Ask for Help

Ask for helpAsking for help with addiction can seem overwhelming, but the truth is, taking that significant step might not be as hard as you think. Think of it this way: It won’t be nearly as painful as struggling with your dependence on drugs or alcohol.

If you have the courage to admit you have a problem and you’re ready to reach out for assistance, you may be surprised to find how many people will respond to your vulnerability with compassion. Here are some tips for finding the support you need to get help.

People are waiting for an opportunity to help.

You might think you are hiding your drug or alcohol use from your friends, family members and co-workers, but many people who are close to you have likely noticed your addiction. They might be waiting for the right moment to talk to you, but haven’t yet found it. Or they don’t know how to broach the subject of addiction, so they have held back instead of speaking up. Perhaps they talked to you about your addiction before, but you weren’t ready to hear their words of concern. If you are ready to finally admit you need help, they will be by your side. Keep in mind that people are aware, available and looking for an opportunity to be supportive.

Don’t shoulder the burden alone. Call us today to get help.

Call 855-935-2871

Lots of people care about you.

Your loved ones might seem fed up with your behavior, but if you are willing to make a change, their attitudes toward you might also change. They may no longer be willing to give you money or listen to the latest trouble you got yourself into, but if you are genuinely interested in getting better, they might surprise you when you tell them you want help.

There’s no bad time to reach out.

You don’t have to wait until you get arrested, kicked out of the house or hit rock bottom to speak up about your addiction. You might think, “Well, I’ve never bought drugs on the street” or “I haven’t gotten a DUI.” The truth is, there’s always another milepost out there, but you don’t have to keep going on the road of addiction. Don’t put it off any longer. There might not be a “next time” when it comes to drug or alcohol use. The right time to reach out is today.

Addiction isn’t embarrassing. It’s a disease.

The stigma that once surrounded addiction has gone away, and it’s now understood that a drug or alcohol problem is a complex disease that affects millions in the United States alone. Most people understand that addiction is bigger and stronger than an individual. There is no shame in saying that you are suffering and looking for support.

There are plenty of people to turn to.

Addiction can be isolating. Whether you’ve lost friends or your spouse because of your drug or alcohol problem or you simply don’t feel like you have anyone left to talk to, there are actually plenty of people to turn to when you decide you need help. Here are just some of the many people you could talk to:

  • Trusted friends, family members, and members of the clergy are all people who can listen or offer guidance.
  • A counselor (especially one who has experience dealing with addiction) and your primary care physician are also good professional resources for helping you find a path toward treatment and recovery.
  • The human resources department of your company might have a manager in charge of “employee assistance,” and that person would be able to help you navigate the process of getting help through your place of work.
  • Calling a recovery center or an addiction hotline are two more anonymous ways of discussing how to get the help you need.
  • Reaching out to a local AA group can help you get in touch with people in your area who have also struggled with addiction and recovery.

Remember: Asking for help is the first big step on your road to recovery. Once you’ve crossed that hurdle and found the support you need, you will no longer be fighting your addiction alone.

We’ve helped hundreds of people just like you. Call now.

Call 855-935-2871

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